What To Think About When Filing Bankruptcy

When you start the process of filing for bankruptcy, you are making the claim that you do not have the money you need to pay your bills. The reasoning behind the lack of funds, does not play any role in the court's decision to accept your petition. Use the tips below to help you through this difficult and confusing process.

Bankruptcy is a very complicated, and scary process. Usually anyone who applies for it, is at the end of ones rope. To help you feel more in control of things, be sure to educate yourself about the entire process before making your decision. Learn the requirements you have to meet before applying.Learn about what the process will be when you do apply.Finally, learn how your future will be affected by it after you file.



Don't be afraid to apply for credit for purchases such as a new home or car just because you have a recently discharged bankruptcy. Many lenders will take your new financial situation into account. They may be more likely to loan money to someone who has no debt due to a bankruptcy than to the person with, say, 75,000 dollars in credit card debt. The fact that you have no monthly credit card payments can make you look like a better risk.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy in the near future, don't charge up your credit cards thinking that you won't have to pay back the debt. In many states, there are rules about how much credit card debt and what kind, may be discharged in a bankruptcy. For instance, if you make purchases for luxury items, such as an expensive new TV, within 6 months prior to filing, you may be obligated to pay that amount back. On the other hand, if you used your credit card to purchase groceries, or other necessities, the rules may be different. Be sure to ask your attorney for advice.

Make a detailed list. Every creditor and debt should be listed on your application. Even if your credit cards do not carry a balance at all, it should still be included. Loans for cars or recreational vehicles should also be included on your application. Full disclosure is imperative during this part of the bankruptcy process.

A good personal bankruptcy tip is to be absolutely sure that you've gone through all of your options before you decide to file for bankruptcy. If the amount you owe is relatively small, you can always try to negotiate it by working through a credit counselor and making small payments.

If you are unsure about the paperwork that you need to bring with you when you meet with an attorney, ask. Also, inquire as to whether the lawyer you are meeting with offers free consultations. read this article do not want to be surprised by a large fee just for them taking a look at your case.

If you are over the age of 55 and filing for bankruptcy, you are not alone. In fact, this age bracket is the most likely to file. Luckily, retirement savings held in retirement accounts and IRAs are not in danger of being depleted in bankruptcy filings under one million dollars.

Don't make the mistake of hesitating to file for bankruptcy because you think you won't be able to file again and may need to save it for a worse financial situation. The laws vary from state to state, but you may file again after a certain period, usually two to eight years, depending on the type of bankruptcy filed. Of course, you won't want to file again, but in case of job loss or a major illness, the opportunity is there if you need it.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, be certain not to transfer any of your belongings or valuables to another person. This includes taking your name off of joint bank accounts or other financial assets. The court will be looking for anything of value in order to repay creditors, and you will be asked under oath whether you have left anything out. If you do not tell the truth, you may be charged with perjury and could possibly spend time in jail. Remember, honesty is the best policy.

Since filing for bankruptcy is quite a complicated process, it is recommended that you find yourself a lawyer that specializes in bankruptcy. There is usually some sort of a fee associated with hiring one though. However, if you can not afford one, you should still look into one since there are organizations that could help you out with the cost of one.

Start taking calls from bill collectors. You may have been avoiding calls from bill collectors, but if you are filing bankruptcy you may need to speak to them. You need to have all of your debts laid out so that your lawyer can get to work involving them in your case. If you don't include a debt, it will not be discharged, and you will still have to pay it.

Fight the temptation to rack up large credit card balances just before filing. The creditor will take a look at your account history. If they determine that you charged a lot before applying for bankruptcy, they can file a request with the court to hold you responsible for the amount that you charged.

Don't get into bankruptcy with a false sense of security. Be aware that once you've filed personal bankruptcy, it is public. Just because it involves personal financial information does not mean that it involves personal privacy. It immediately becomes public information. Anyone and everyone can see everything about your finances, if they chose to search for it.


Before filing for bankruptcy, keep in mind that child support will not be discharged in a bankruptcy case. The reason for this is that child support is a responsibility that a parent must pay. Bankruptcy does not remove that responsibility. Be sure to include any child support in your list of debts that will remain with you after the bankruptcy is discharged.

If you are avoiding personal bankruptcy but fear that you will lose your retirement savings, you should know that is not likely to happen. If https://www.rstreet.org/2018/03/06/behind-on-your-student-loans-some-want-the-government-to-keep-you-from-working/ have an ERISA qualified retirement program (most are), then your retirement savings are safe from claims by creditors. This applies to funds in 401ks and to most IRAs. Consult your own bankruptcy attorney for specific details for your circumstances, but you should know the odds are in your favor.

There are two common types of personal bankruptcy. One in which all your assets are liquidated and the other creates a plan to pay off debts within a few years. It is recommended that you meet with an attorney to determine which type of bankruptcy is best for your particular situation.

Make sure that you do everything in your power to avoid bankruptcy. Avoid financial disaster and make sure that you are not going to be embarrassed around friends and family, the next time they talk about their finances and credit history. Hopefully, this article has helped you out.

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